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The history of Irish currency
Coin Collecting News

1914 - 2014 100th anniversary of Wo  ....
1914 - 2014 During July 2014 The Royal Mint were selling 1914 sovereigns on their website to tie in with the 100th anniversary of World War One for £350.

1937 Gold Sovereigns - Edward VII 1  ....
1937 Gold Sovereigns - Edward VII 1937

1975 Full Sovereign British Gold Co  ....
1975 Full Sovereign British Gold Coin Uncirculated Decimal Head

Three new British coins  ....
New coins released include a 50p to commemorate Battle of Britain and a £2 to mark First World War centenaryThird coin is £2 marking 800th anniversary of Magna Carta showing King John accepting historic treaty in 1215

1925 Gold Sovereigns - Edward VII 1  ....
1925 Gold Sovereigns - Edward VII 1925

gold coin from reign of King George  ....
Rare £5 gold coin from reign of King George III expected to fetch £250,000 at auction

€3.5m cost of minting copper coins  ....
€3.5m cost of minting copper coins makes no cents


The history of Irish currency reflects Ireland's political development over the last 1000 years. What began with the Vikings, who hammered out the very first Irish coins in Dublin in the 10th century, has left us with a marvellous legacy that marks

 

The history of Irish currency reflects Ireland's political development over the last 1000 years. What began with the Vikings, who hammered out the very first Irish coins in Dublin in the 10th century, has left us with a marvellous legacy that marks social changes, political propaganda and economic trends. Indeed Irish coins and, more recently, banknotes, are outstanding historical documents. - See more at: The oldest Irish coins date to the Vikings

The very first Irish coins were struck by the Vikings in Dublin in about 997AD by order of their King Sihtric III, also known as Silkbeard. Until this time, a variety of coinage had circulated in Ireland, including Anglo-Saxon, western European and even Islamic from central Asia.

The new coins were copies of coins issued by King Ethelred II of England. Whenever the Anglo-Saxon king redesigned his coinage over the next two decades, the Vikings issued copy-cat versions.

After the Battle of Clontarf (1014), however, the Irish coin reverted to an earlier design for more than a century.

All the Irish coins produced had a one penny value, and were created (in theory) from a pennyweight of silver (one 240th of a pound weight). Over time, the quality and weight decreased, and the design became less and less legible.

 

 
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