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1925 Gold Sovereigns
Coin Collecting News

1914 - 2014 100th anniversary of Wo  ....
1914 - 2014 During July 2014 The Royal Mint were selling 1914 sovereigns on their website to tie in with the 100th anniversary of World War One for £350.

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1925 Gold Sovereigns - Edward VII 1  ....
1925 Gold Sovereigns - Edward VII 1925

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One of the most unusual facts about 1925 sovereigns is that in 1949, 1950 and 1951, the Royal Mint produced sovereigns, but instead of preparing new dies with George VI's head, and with the correct date, they lazily re-issued George V sovereigns da

1925 Gold Sovereigns

Not every date exists for gold sovereigns. The London mint virtually stopped producing sovereigns after 1916, except for 1925. From 1917, the branch mints continued to issue most of the sovereign production. In 1925 a total of five mints issued sovereigns, London, Sydney, Melbourne and Perth, and Pretoria mint South Africa.
We have notice an irregular edge on quite a number of the Sydney Mint sovereigns of 1925, 
Official Restrikes

One of the most unusual facts about 1925 sovereigns is that in 1949, 1950 and 1951, the Royal Mint produced sovereigns, but instead of preparing new dies with George VI's head, and with the correct date, they lazily re-issued George V sovereigns dated 1925. Prior to this, 1925 London Mint sovereigns were quite scarce, especially in mint condition, suddenly they were again available.

 However the restrikes can be distinguished from the originals by the more pronounced rim around the edge of the coin. Despite the lower mintage figures for the restrikes, the high-rimmed restrikes are actually much more common than the low-rimmed originals, due the fact that the originals were melted down in huge quantities for bullion.

 

 
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