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1989 Gold Sovereigns Coins Were Different
Coin Collecting News

Full Sovereign gold  ....
Branch Mints - Ottawa Canada History

1925 Gold Sovereigns  ....
One of the most unusual facts about 1925 sovereigns is that in 1949, 1950 and 1951, the Royal Mint produced sovereigns, but instead of preparing new dies with George VI's head, and with the correct date, they lazily re-issued George V sovereigns da

1933 Gold Sovereigns Were Not Issue  ....
1933 Gold Sovereigns Were Not Issued Neither were half sovereigns.

1937 Gold Sovereigns - Edward VII 1  ....
1937 Gold Sovereigns - Edward VII 1937

1989 Gold Sovereigns Coins Were Dif  ....
1989 Gold Sovereigns Were Different As you can see from our photographs, 1989 sovereigns did not use the by now traditional St. George and Dragon reverse design. Instead to commemorate the 500th anniversary of the first gold sovereign for Henry VII

Sixpence  ....
Things of interest

Firet Gold Coins  ....
The first gold sovereign in the reign of Henry VII The first Sovereign, its designs rich in symbolism, was part of the trappings of the new Tudor dynasty.


1989 Gold Sovereigns Were Different As you can see from our photographs, 1989 sovereigns did not use the by now traditional St. George and Dragon reverse design. Instead to commemorate the 500th anniversary of the first gold sovereign for Henry VII

1989 Gold Sovereigns Coins Were Different
As you can see from our photographs, 1989 sovereigns did not use the by now traditional St. George and Dragon reverse design. Instead to commemorate the 500th anniversary of the first gold sovereign for Henry VII in 1489, the designs chosen for both sides of the 1989 gold coins reflected the designs originally used five centuries ago. Very few coins or currencies can boast such lengthy service.
The original sovereigns were intended to be used as a symbol of Britain's importance and wealth, to impress the rest of Europe.
Rather than us repeat its history, you can take a look at our First Gold Sovereign page.

Obverse
The obverse, or head side, shows the Queen seated facing on a throne. The majestic appearance of this design, combined with the large size, weight and purity of the original sovereigns, is the reason the new gold coin came to be called a sovereign in the first place.

Reverse
The reverse design also mirrors its 500 year old original counterpart, bearing the Royal Arms surmounted on a crowned double Tudor rose.

Designer
Both sides of the coin were designed by the sculptor Bernard Sindall.

Proof Only
The 1989 sovereign, as all dates of sovereign from 1983 to 1999 inclusive, was only available as a proof. There was no ordinary uncirculated version made.

Issue Limit and Mintage
There were 10,535 sovereigns issued in 1989. The issue limit was 12,500 pieces. This shows that the Royal Mint did not manage to sell as many as it had hoped to, and presumably forecast. The sales period for this coin would have been from about January 1989 to about mid 1990, although these dates, vary often from year to year. The end date possibly depends on whether the Mint decide to run another production batch. We should perhaps explain that as a factory, the Mint do not produce the entire issue limit in one production run, but make a large initial batch, followed by one or more smaller batches through the lifetime of the products marketing phase. Towards the end of a period, they may decide that there was not enough residual demand to make it worthwhile making and storing an economic batch quantity.

 
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