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The First British Silver Crown
Coin Collecting News

Full Sovereign gold  ....
Branch Mints - Ottawa Canada History

1925 Gold Sovereigns  ....
One of the most unusual facts about 1925 sovereigns is that in 1949, 1950 and 1951, the Royal Mint produced sovereigns, but instead of preparing new dies with George VI's head, and with the correct date, they lazily re-issued George V sovereigns da

1933 Gold Sovereigns Were Not Issue  ....
1933 Gold Sovereigns Were Not Issued Neither were half sovereigns.

1937 Gold Sovereigns - Edward VII 1  ....
1937 Gold Sovereigns - Edward VII 1937

1989 Gold Sovereigns Coins Were Dif  ....
1989 Gold Sovereigns Were Different As you can see from our photographs, 1989 sovereigns did not use the by now traditional St. George and Dragon reverse design. Instead to commemorate the 500th anniversary of the first gold sovereign for Henry VII

Sixpence  ....
Things of interest

Firet Gold Coins  ....
The first gold sovereign in the reign of Henry VII The first Sovereign, its designs rich in symbolism, was part of the trappings of the new Tudor dynasty.


The First British Silver Crown The first silver crown was produced in 1551 under Edward VI. It was one of the first British coins to bear a date, which was in Arabic numerals.

The First British Silver Crown
The first silver crown was produced in 1551 under Edward VI. It was one of the first British coins to bear a date, which was in Arabic numerals.

From 1551, crowns were issued in both gold and silver, until the gold crown was discontinued after 1662.

Victoria
There were four different crown designs issued for Queen Victoria.
The first design carried a youthful portrait with a bare head, the reverse design being a large shield bearing the Royal Arms, crowned and within a laurel wreath. This "Young Head" design was issued from 1839 to 1847, although the 1839 was issued as a proof only, and is very rare.
The second Victorian crown type was the Gothic design, with a large bust of the queen wearing a crown and an ornately embroidered dress. The reverse design is cruciform shields, with roses, thistles and shamrocks in the tressured angles. he inscriptions on both sides are in Gothic script, and are unusual in being in lower case, except of course for the capitalised initial letter V of Victoria.
Coin inscriptions, like tradesmen's signs are more frequently designed using all capital letters.
The Gothic design was only issued in two years, 1847 and 1853. The latter was issued only as a proof and is very rare.
As with all the silver and gold coinage, the crown was changed in 1887 to the new design for Victoria's golden jubilee, and this design continued until 1892.
The final design change for Victoria was to the "Old" or "Widow" head design in 1893, and this continued until the final year of her reign 1901. The edges of the Old Head crowns are letter with the regnal year, starting with "ANNO REGNI LVI" in the first part of 1893. There are two regnal dates per calendar year, as this changed at the anniversary of the queen's accession to the throne.

 
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